Unit 2 Quiz 2

Patricia Chavez Nunez

Read the following passage below and answer the following questions about the story. Make the best inferences possible based on the facts in the story.Click on the letter next to the best inference based on the information in the passage.

  1. One of the last stagecoach robberies was made by a woman in 1898, in Globe, Arizona. Pearl Hart was a 27 year old cook in a mining camp. She convinced her accomplice, Joe Boot, that there was more money robbing stagecoaches than working in a mining camp. As the Globe stage turned a bend, the two robbers were waiting, armed with rifles. The three passengers were robbed of $431. Several days after the robbery, they were caught by the local sheriff. When arrested, she was asked, "Would you do it again?" She replied, "Absolutely!" Boot got 35 years in prison for robbing the stage, but Pearl only got 5 years. She was the only female prisoner in the Yuma Territorial Prison. She was next heard of in 1903, when she was arrested at Deming, New Mexico for conspiring to pull a train robbery, but she was released for lack of evidence. She was last seen in 1924, a small, innocent-looking 53 year-old woman, busy recalling her life-----at the Pima County Jail. What can you infer about women and stagecoach robberies?
  2. Your answer:
    A woman robbing a stagecoach was surprising?
    Women never robbed stagecoaches.
    Women often robbed stagecoaches.
    Pearl robbed many stagecoaches.


  3. One of the last stagecoach robberies was made by a woman in 1898, in Globe, Arizona. Pearl Hart was a 27 year old cook in a mining camp. She convinced her accomplice, Joe Boot, that there was more money robbing stagecoaches than working in a mining camp. As the Globe stage turned a bend, the two robbers were waiting, armed with rifles. The three passengers were robbed of $431. Several days after the robbery, they were caught by the local sheriff. When arrested, she was asked, "Would you do it again?" She replied, "Absolutely!" Boot got 35 years in prison for robbing the stage, but Pearl only got 5 years. She was the only female prisoner in the Yuma Territorial Prison. She was next heard of in 1903, when she was arrested at Deming, New Mexico for conspiring to pull a train robbery, but she was released for lack of evidence. She was last seen in 1924, a small, innocent-looking 53 year-old woman, busy recalling her life-----at the Pima County Jail. These two robbers were:
  4. Your answer:
    able to buy alot of things with the money they stole
    inexperienced and unlucky
    lucky and successful
    experienced and skillful


  5. One of the last stagecoach robberies was made by a woman in 1898, in Globe, Arizona. Pearl Hart was a 27 year old cook in a mining camp. She convinced her accomplice, Joe Boot, that there was more money robbing stagecoaches than working in a mining camp. As the Globe stage turned a bend, the two robbers were waiting, armed with rifles. The three passengers were robbed of $431. Several days after the robbery, they were caught by the local sheriff. When arrested, she was asked, "Would you do it again?" She replied, "Absolutely!" Boot got 35 years in prison for robbing the stage, but Pearl only got 5 years. She was the only female prisoner in the Yuma Territorial Prison. She was next heard of in 1903, when she was arrested at Deming, New Mexico for conspiring to pull a train robbery, but she was released for lack of evidence. She was last seen in 1924, a small, innocent-looking 53 year-old woman, busy recalling her life-----at the Pima County Jail. Pearl Hart
  6. Your answer:
    never committed a crime again.
    was ashamed of her criminal activity.
    liked the idea of being a robber.
    was talked into crime by evil friends.


  7. Read the following paragraph telling a story about how two kings compared how good the steel in their swords was. Then use your inference skills to answer the questions that follow. Once during the Crusades in the Middle Ages, Richard the Lionhearted, king of England, boasted to the Moslem ruler Saladin that Richard's sword was of the best steel. The sword, made in England, could cut an iron rod in two. Richard, with a quick sword stroke, proved this. Saladin did the same. But then Saladin handed Richard a soft silk pillow and asked him to cut this in half with his sword. Richard tried but failed. His sword just made a soft quiet sound on the soft silk. Saladin then took his own sword which was made of steel from Damascus, Syria. With a single stroke he sliced neatly through the pillow. The two kings
  8. Your answer:
    were enemies at war.
    hated each other.
    were friends.
    met to make a peace treaty.


  9. Read the following paragraph telling a story about how two kings compared how good the steel in their swords was. Then use your inference skills to answer the questions that follow. Once during the Crusades in the Middle Ages, Richard the Lionhearted, king of England, boasted to the Moslem ruler Saladin that Richard's sword was of the best steel. The sword, made in England, could cut an iron rod in two. Richard, with a quick sword stroke, proved this. Saladin did the same. But then Saladin handed Richard a soft silk pillow and asked him to cut this in half with his sword. Richard tried but failed. His sword just made a soft quiet sound on the soft silk. Saladin then took his own sword which was made of steel from Damascus, Syria. With a single stroke he sliced neatly through the pillow. The two kings
  10. Your answer:
    did not care what each other thought.
    made boasts with nothing to back them up.
    liked proving that each was better than the other.
    were modest.


  11. Read the following paragraph telling a story about how two kings compared how good the steel in their swords was. Then use your inference skills to answer the questions that follow. Once during the Crusades in the Middle Ages, Richard the Lionhearted, king of England, boasted to the Moslem ruler Saladin that Richard's sword was of the best steel. The sword, made in England, could cut an iron rod in two. Richard, with a quick sword stroke, proved this. Saladin did the same. But then Saladin handed Richard a soft silk pillow and asked him to cut this in half with his sword. Richard tried but failed. His sword just made a soft quiet sound on the soft silk. Saladin then took his own sword which was made of steel from Damascus, Syria. With a single stroke he sliced neatly through the pillow. Both kings were
  12. Your answer:
    equally good kings.
    proud of their swords.
    wrong about their swords.
    right about their swords.


  13. Read the following paragraph telling a story about how two kings compared how good the steel in their swords was. Then use your inference skills to answer the questions that follow. Once during the Crusades in the Middle Ages, Richard the Lionhearted, king of England, boasted to the Moslem ruler Saladin that Richard's sword was of the best steel. The sword, made in England, could cut an iron rod in two. Richard, with a quick sword stroke, proved this. Saladin did the same. But then Saladin handed Richard a soft silk pillow and asked him to cut this in half with his sword. Richard tried but failed. His sword just made a soft quiet sound on the soft silk. Saladin then took his own sword which was made of steel from Damascus, Syria. With a single stroke he sliced neatly through the pillow. A sword that could cut through an iron rod is
  14. Your answer:
    the best weapon.
    very sharp.
    better than a sword that can cut through silk.
    very strong.


  15. Read the following paragraph telling a story about how two kings compared how good the steel in their swords was. Then use your inference skills to answer the questions that follow. Once during the Crusades in the Middle Ages, Richard the Lionhearted, king of England, boasted to the Moslem ruler Saladin that Richard's sword was of the best steel. The sword, made in England, could cut an iron rod in two. Richard, with a quick sword stroke, proved this. Saladin did the same. But then Saladin handed Richard a soft silk pillow and asked him to cut this in half with his sword. Richard tried but failed. His sword just made a soft quiet sound on the soft silk. Saladin then took his own sword which was made of steel from Damascus, Syria. With a single stroke he sliced neatly through the pillow. Richard's sword could not cut through the silk pillow because
  16. Your answer:
    it was not sharp enough
    it was not strong enough
    it was too heavy
    swords cannot cut through soft things like pillows


  17. Read the following paragraph telling a story about how two kings compared how good the steel in their swords was. Then use your inference skills to answer the questions that follow. Once during the Crusades in the Middle Ages, Richard the Lionhearted, king of England, boasted to the Moslem ruler Saladin that Richard's sword was of the best steel. The sword, made in England, could cut an iron rod in two. Richard, with a quick sword stroke, proved this. Saladin did the same. But then Saladin handed Richard a soft silk pillow and asked him to cut this in half with his sword. Richard tried but failed. His sword just made a soft quiet sound on the soft silk. Saladin then took his own sword which was made of steel from Damascus, Syria. With a single stroke he sliced neatly through the pillow. The better sword belonged to
  18. Your answer:
    both
    neither
    Richard
    Saladin


  19. Read the following paragraph telling a story about how two kings compared how good the steel in their swords was. Then use your inference skills to answer the questions that follow. Once during the Crusades in the Middle Ages, Richard the Lionhearted, king of England, boasted to the Moslem ruler Saladin that Richard's sword was of the best steel. The sword, made in England, could cut an iron rod in two. Richard, with a quick sword stroke, proved this. Saladin did the same. But then Saladin handed Richard a soft silk pillow and asked him to cut this in half with his sword. Richard tried but failed. His sword just made a soft quiet sound on the soft silk. Saladin then took his own sword which was made of steel from Damascus, Syria. With a single stroke he sliced neatly through the pillow. Steel made in England
  20. Your answer:
    was better for making swords than steel from Damascus
    could not hold a very sharp edge
    was not as good for making swords as steel from Damacus
    made very poor swords


  21. Read the next passage to infer details the author doesn't state directly. Click on the letter next to the best inference. Rosa decided to walk to the doctor's office rather than take the bus. She felt the air would do her some good despite the fact that Julio did not like her to walk alone at this time of the day. Rosa could see the sun slowly setting in front of her. She walked along thinking of the previous night. She really didn't need the doctor to tell her what she already knew. After all, she had two children. She was going to tell Julio last night, but she decided to wait until after she had seen the doctor. What time of day was it?
  22. Your answer:
    It was late afternoon.
    It was late night.
    It was early afternoon.
    It was morning


  23. Read the next passage to infer details the author doesn't state directly. Click on the letter next to the best inference. Rosa decided to walk to the doctor's office rather than take the bus. She felt the air would do her some good despite the fact that Julio did not like her to walk alone at this time of the day. Rosa could see the sun slowly setting in front of her. She walked along thinking of the previous night. She really didn't need the doctor to tell her what she already knew. After all, she had two children. She was going to tell Julio last night, but she decided to wait until after she had seen the doctor. Why do you think Julio didn't like her walking alone at that time of day?
  24. Your answer:
    It wasn't safe to walk in that neighborhood when it was beginning to get dark.
    It was easier to walk.
    It was safe to walk in that neighborhood anytime of the day.
    It was easier to take the bus.


  25. Read the next passage to infer details the author doesn't state directly. Click on the letter next to the best inference. Rosa decided to walk to the doctor's office rather than take the bus. She felt the air would do her some good despite the fact that Julio did not like her to walk alone at this time of the day. Rosa could see the sun slowly setting in front of her. She walked along thinking of the previous night. She really didn't need the doctor to tell her what she already knew. After all, she had two children. She was going to tell Julio last night, but she decided to wait until after she had seen the doctor. Why did Rosa wait to tell Julio her news?
  26. Your answer:
    She didn't have anything to tell him.
    She wanted to be sure.
    She didn't want to tell him.
    She didn't have any experience about these things.


  27. Read the next passage to infer details the author doesn't state directly. Click on the letter next to the best inference. Rosa decided to walk to the doctor's office rather than take the bus. She felt the air would do her some good despite the fact that Julio did not like her to walk alone at this time of the day. Rosa could see the sun slowly setting in front of her. She walked along thinking of the previous night. She really didn't need the doctor to tell her what she already knew. After all, she had two children. She was going to tell Julio last night, but she decided to wait until after she had seen the doctor. What news did Rosa have to tell Julio.
  28. Your answer:
    She had a new job.
    She wanted to move.
    She was going to have a baby.
    She wasn't afraid to walk in that neighborhood.


  29. Read the next passage about body types and personalities and click on the letter next to the best inference you can make. There is no end to theories about body shape and personality, and there is not doubt that certain people with certain bodies often have very predictable characters. However, there are some researchers who believe that the many instances in which body and personality go together are due to stereotyping; that is, we expect a certain type of person to have certain traits, so we see those traits whether they are there or not. For example, muscular people are believed to be dominant and forceful, so we treat them as leaders. But sometimes they are actually shy and timid. Fat people are supposed to be happy and warmhearted, but in reality they can just as easily be depressed or mean. Sometimes people will even act the way they think others expect them to act. By doing that, people fill the role in which we picture them. No matter how you picture it, bodies and personalities are related, whether by chance or choice. However, there are always exceptions to the rule and whenever that happens, there goes the theory. After all, we're only human, and hopefully that means we have a mind of our own--whether we're fat, skinny or something in between. We can infer from the passage that
  30. Your answer:
    ancient people didn't know enough to understand personality and theories.
    it takes a scientific mind to identify and categorize people according to body type
    very few theories that cateorize people by their appearance have been popular.
    it's natural for people to look for relationships between physical characterisics and personality.



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