Skip Discover Education Main Navigation

Honorable Mention

Honorable Mention


Polling Station

While coming in first is exhilarating, not everyone wins. This isn't the easiest lesson, but it is an important one for you to teach your kids. Maybe they didn't get picked for the travel soccer team or win the science fair, but show them they are all winners and can shine in many untraditional ways.

You can nurture your child's positive self-esteem by helping him discover what he IS good at doing. Part of his self-esteem comes from feeling competent and skilled at something he enjoys.

As her parent, you play a big role in helping your daughter be successful and feel good about herself. Be her role model! Kids develop their sense of character at a very young age, using the adults in their lives as models and mentors.

Show him that patience, enthusiasm, and work ethic count just as much as natural talent.

Find an activity where everyone shines, such as martial arts. With this, the goal is not to win, but to demonstrate your best, giving 100 percent and enjoying the chance to compete. It is not in the winning or losing, but in the competing that your child is able to demonstrate her level of knowledge and control.

If that is not for her, sign her up for a dance or art class. You're sure to find something she has a gift for, where she can stand out. Get her involved in something of personal connection and meaning. Harness her interests.

Does he love animals? If so, take him to a shelter to help out, or find a local visiting pet program where he can cheer the old or sick with his pet.

Is your child a nature enthusiast? Check out a junior ranger program. There are hundreds of national, state and local parks throughout the country so there's sure to be one near you.

Maybe she is a budding actress. Drama classes can be an excellent way for her to become a more confident speaker, to learn how to memorize more efficiently, and simply to have fun.

When your child has a passion and excitement for something, she is a winner.

Keep communication open. Even if he won't talk to you—keep talking. "Is there anything I can do to make you feel more comfortable?" "Do the kids wear or have anything different from the kids back home? Do you need anything?" "Would you like me to talk to your teacher?"


curved edge