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Pendemonium: Panic in Peru: Pronouns
Pendemonium: Panic in Peru: Pronouns
Grade level: 3-5 Subject: Language Arts Duration: 1 class period
 



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Student Objectives
  • Identify pronouns and their purpose.
  • Separate subject pronouns from object pronouns and possessive pronouns.
  • Explore the use of subject pronouns (I, you, he, she, it, we, and they).
  • Examine object pronouns (me, you, him, her, it, me, them).
  • Analyze possessive pronouns (mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs).
  • Illustrate how pronouns must match their nouns.
  • Work effectively in small groups.
Materials
  • Panic in Peru: Pronounsvideo
  • Paper, pens, and pencils
  • Crayons, colored pencils, or colored markers
  • Three paper bags: one filled with subject pronouns written on small sheets of paper, one filled with object pronouns written on small sheets of paper, and one filled with possessive pronouns written on small sheets of paper
  • Pronoun Sheet: a graphic organizer sheet that includes a column for subject pronouns, a column for object pronouns, and a column for possessive pronouns
  • Duplicated copies of a newspaper article of your choice
  • Bingo sheets with three columns across (horizontally) and five columns up and down (vertically)
  • Markers or game pieces (or anything that could be used for bingo)
  • Print resources about pronouns
Procedures
  1. After viewing the video, reinforce its concepts by readingI and You and Don't Forget Who: What Is a Pronoun?, by Brian P. Cleary, or a similar book with a lighthearted look at pronouns.
  2. Briefly review pronouns, subject pronouns, object pronouns, and possessive pronouns, and go over how a pronoun must match its subject.
  3. Go around the room and ask each student to name a pronoun and then tell whether it’s a subject pronoun, an object pronoun, or a possessive pronoun.
  4. Write the following sentences on the board and ask students to fill in the blanks with the correct pronoun. Then have volunteers identify whether it is a subject pronoun, an object pronoun, or a possessive pronoun:
    • Deborah and ________ are planning to go skating on Saturday.
    • The principal announced that ______ would have to repair the fence.
    • I don't want anyone but ____ to know that I am going to have to move away.
    • If it were up to _______, Jacob would have come with ____.
    • Who else could have planned the surprise party except for _____?
    • I can't kick a soccer ball as far as _______ can.
    • Neither my mother nor yours would give _______ permission to go on that trip out of town.
    • Hector and Luis know the best route to take, so let ______lead us out of the forest.
  5. Bring in copies of a newspaper article appropriate for the grade level and distribute them to students. Give them a specified amount of time, perhaps five minutes, to find as many pronouns as they can. Then ask students to place the pronouns in the correct column on the Pronoun Sheet. Have volunteers offer to read the correct answers aloud.
  6. Play a game of Pronoun Bingo. Distribute blank bingo sheets and markers. Then read the following list of subject pronouns (I, you, he, she, it, we, they), object pronouns (me, you, him, her, it, me, them), and possessive pronouns (mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs) to the class and ask students to place each word in a square of their choice. Then play the game as you would any bingo game. Call words and have the students place a marker over that word. The first one to cover all the necessary words says, "bingo!" Allow students to offer ideas of what game to play—one row, an X, a frame, or the whole card.
  7. As a final activity, divide the class into groups of three and have the students choose three words from the subject pronoun bag, three from the object pronoun bag, and three from the possessive pronoun bag. Ask the teams to write a story that include those nine words. Ask them to circle the words as they appear in their story. Tell students that they can illustrate their stories using crayons, colored markers, or colored pencils. Ask the groups to read their completed stories to the entire class.

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Assessment
Use the following three-point rubric to evaluate students' work during this lesson.
  • 3 points: Students consistently worked effectively in small groups; were consistently able to identify pronouns, subject pronouns, object pronouns, and possessive pronouns; were consistently able to match pronouns with their nouns; and were consistently able to create stories using pronouns.
  • 2 points: Students usually worked effectively in small groups; were usually able to identify pronouns, subject pronouns, object pronouns, and possessive pronouns; were usually able to match pronouns with their subjects; and were usually able to create stories using pronouns.
  • 1 point: Students rarely worked effectively in small groups; were rarely able to identify pronouns, subject pronouns, object pronouns and possessive pronouns; were rarely able to match pronouns with their subjects; and were rarely able to create stories using verbs.

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Vocabulary
appalling
Definition:Frightful
Context:Jennifer behaved in an appalling manner by screaming during the meeting.

familiar
Definition:Well known or easily recognized
Context:The baby smiled because he was familiar with everyone who was at the party.

melodious
Definition:Agreeable to the ear; having a musical sound
Context:Greg heard something melodious and stopped his studying to listen carefully.

motivation
Definition:A stimulus or influence
Context:What could have been the motivation for you to ask that kind of question?

object pronouns
Definition:Replace object nouns (me, you, him, her, it, us, them)
Context:In the sentence, "Mario and Bob were in a hurry to get me started on the project," me is an object pronoun.

possessive pronouns
Definition:Pronouns that show what belongs to a noun; they must match the nouns they are replacing (mine, yours, his, her, ours, theirs)
Context:In the sentence, "Meredith takes ballet classes on Mondays and Fridays, while her brother takes judo classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays," her is a possessive pronoun.

pronouns
Definition:Words that replace nouns in a sentence
Context:In the sentence, "You always like to eat before you do your exercises," are three pronouns: you, you, and your.

subject pronouns
Definition:Pronouns that tell what the sentence is about; replace subject nouns in a sentence (I, you, he, she, it, we, they)
Context:In the sentence, "He was the first one to arrive, but she soon followed," both he and she are subject pronouns.

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Print Resources
Cleary, Brian.I and You and Don't Forget Who: What Is a Pronoun?Lerner Group, 2004.
Rhyming text and attractive illustrations combine to offer substance about pronouns in an engaging manner.

Collins, S. Harold.Nouns and Pronouns. Garlic Press, 1995.

Greenberg, Dan.Comic-Strip Grammar: 40 Reproductive Cartoons With Engaging Practice Exercises that make Learning Grammar Fun: Grades 4-6, Scholastic, Inc., 2000.
This is another clear example of how lively illustrations and rhyming text can provide an attractive way for students to spend time with pronouns.

Kiestre, Jane Bell,Caught 'YA! Grammar With a Giggle. Maupin House Publishing, 1996.
This book utilizes humor to engage students in the study of grammar.

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Academic Standards
Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL)
McREL's Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K–12 Education addresses 14 content areas. To view the standards and benchmarks, visithttp://www.mcrel.org/compendium/browse.asp.
This lesson plan addresses the following national standards:
  • Language Arts: Viewing – Uses viewing skills and strategies to understand and interpret visual media
  • Language Arts: Writing – Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process; uses grammatical and mechanical conventions in written compositions
  • Language Arts: Reading – Uses the general skills and strategies of the reading process
  • Language Arts: Grammar and Usage – Uses pronouns in written compositions (substitutes pronouns for nouns and understands the concept of pronoun agreement)
The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)
The National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association have developed national standards to provide guidelines for teaching the English language arts. To view the standards online, go tohttp://www.ncte.org/about/over/standards/110846.htm.
  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

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