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Lesson Plans Library 9-12 > Chemistry
Interactive Periodic Table of the Elements
Interactive Periodic Table of the Elements
Grade level: 9-12 Subject: Chemistry Duration:
 



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Disc 1. Alkali Metals and Alkaline-Earth Metals

Explore the alkali metals to see how they react violently with water and tarnish rapidly in dry air. Then, take a look at the alkaline-earth metals, which are generally softer than most other metals.

Overview of Alkali Metals
Because they are highly reactive, the alkali metals are never found uncombined in nature. Examine the key properties, characteristics, and uses of the six alkali metals.

  • lithium
  • potassium
  • cesium
  • sodium
  • rubidium
  • francium
  • Overview of Alkaline-Earth Metals
    Almost as unstable as alkali metals, alkaline-earth metals are soft, silvery metals that react easily with water. Learn about the common properties and unique characteristics of these metallic elements.

  • beryllium
  • strontium
  • magnesium
  • barium
  • calcium
  • radium
  • Bonus Materials

    Three Phases of Matter: Demonstration of Temperature Changes
    Watch a demonstration of the effects of temperature on atoms in their three states of matter.
    Organic and Inorganic Material in Bones
    Take a digital tour through bone matter to see how organic and inorganic materials combine to make strong, flexible bones.

    Academic Standards

    National Academy of Sciences
    The National Academy of Sciences provides guidelines for teaching science in grades K12 to promote scientific literacy. To view the standards, visit this Web site:books.nap.edu/html/nses/html/overview.html#content.
    This disc addresses the following national standards:

    • Physical Science: Structure and properties of matter; chemical reactions
    • Science and Technology: Understanding about science and technology

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    Disc 2. Transition Metals

    The transition metals are malleable and ductile elements, and they make up the largest elemental group on the table.

    Overview of Transition Metals
    The transition metals are generally known for their hardness, high densities, and melting and boiling points. Examine the shared traits and unique properties of this large group of elements.

    Transition Metals I
    Discuss the unique properties and characteristics of the first part of the transition metal group, metals scandium through cadmium.

  • scandium
  • vanadium
  • titanium
  • chromium
  • manganese
  • nickel
  • iron
  • copper
  • cobalt
  • zinc
  • yttrium
  • ruthenium
  • zirconium
  • rhodium
  • niobium
  • palladium
  • molybdenum
  • silver
  • technetium
  • cadmium
  •  

    Transition Metals II
    Discuss the unique properties and characteristics of the second part of the transition metal group, metals hafnium to ununbiium.

  • hafnium
  • rutherfordium
  • tantalum
  • dubnium
  • tungsten
  • seaborgium
  • rhenium
  • bohrium
  • osmium
  • hassium
  • iridium
  • meitnerium
  • platinum
  • darmstadtium
  • gold
  • roentgenium
  • mercury
  • ununbiium
  • Bonus Materials

    Iron Rusting and Corrosion
    How does iron rust? Examine the rusting and corrosion process.
    Lanthanide Contraction
    Learn why the change in atomic radius from element to element on the periodic table is so highly pronounced in the lanthanide series.
    Uranium Fission
    Watch a demonstration of fission as it occurs in the isotope uranium-235.

    Academic Standards

    National Academy of Sciences
    The National Academy of Sciences provides guidelines for teaching science in grades K12 to promote scientific literacy. To view the standards, visit this Web site:books.nap.edu/html/nses/html/overview.html#content.
    This lesson plan addresses the following national standards:

    • Physical Science: Structure and properties of matter; chemical reactions
    • Science and Technology: Understanding about science and technology

    Back to Top

    Disc 3. Other Metals, Metalloids, Nonmetals, and Gases

    Compare the other metals with the metalloids. See how nonmetals are essential to the natural world, explore the noble gases, learn how halogens help keep us safe.

    Overview of Other Metals
    The other metals group contains some of the most widely used elements in the world. Discuss the composition and uses of these elements and compare them with the transition.

  • aluminum
  • thallium
  • gallium
  • lead
  • indium
  • bismuth
  • tin
  •    

    Overview of Metalloids
    Sometimes acting as metals and sometimes as nonmetals, the metalloids may be the strangest and perhaps most useful group of elements on the periodic table.

  • boron
  • antimony
  • silicon
  • tellurium
  • germanium
  • polonium
  • arsenic
  •    

    Overview of Nonmetals
    There are far fewer nonmetals than metals on the periodic table; however, the nonmetals are essential components of many of Earth's natural resources.

  • hydrogen
  • phosphorous
  • carbon
  • sulfur
  • nitrogen
  • selenium
  • oxygen
  •    

    Overview of Halogens
    Comprised of fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine and astatine, the halogens are highly reactive nonmetals with relatively low melting and boiling points.

  • fluorine
  • iodine
  • chlorine
  • astatine
  • bromine
  •  

    Overview of Noble Gases
    The noble gases are the most stable group of elements on the periodic table; learn their key properties and uses.

  • helium
  • krypton
  • neon
  • xenon
  • argon
  • radon
  • Bonus Materials

    Flexible Carbon
    Examine four different allotropes made of carbon.
    Teflon Magic
    See how Teflon is created.
    Noble Glow
    Watch what happens when electrons from noble gases release energy.
    Doping Silicon
    See how silicon reacts when it is treated with impurities.
    Atoms, the Building Blocks of Matter
    Discover just how small an atom is.

    Academic Standards

    National Academy of Sciences
    The National Academy of Sciences provides guidelines for teaching science in grades K12 to promote scientific literacy. To view the standards, visit this Web site:books.nap.edu/html/nses/html/overview.html#content.
    This disc addresses the following national standards:

    • Physical Science: Physical Science: Structure and properties of matter; chemical reactions; Structure of atoms; Interactions of energy and matter
    • Science and Technology: Understanding about science and technology
    • Science as Inquiry: Understanding about scientific inquiry
    • History and Nature of Science: Historical perspectives; Science as a human endeavor; Nature of scientific knowledge
    • Earth and Space Science: Energy in the Earth system; Geochemical cycles; Properties of earth materials

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    Disc 4. Lanthanides and Actinides

    Take a closer look at the lanthanide series and the radioactive actinide series to discover the dangers and benefits of nuclear energy.

    Overview of the Lanthanide Series
    The lanthanides are also called the rare-earth elements because scientists once believed these common metals were hard to come by.

  • lanthanum
  • terbium
  • cerium
  • dysprosium
  • praseodymium
  • holmium
  • neodymium
  • erbium
  • promethium
  • thulium
  • samarium
  • ytterbium
  • europium
  • lutetium
  • gadolinium
  • Overview of the Actinide Series
    The radioactivity of the actinide elements can be beneficial, such as for cancer treatment and as heat and power sources.

  • actinium
  • berkelium
  • thorium
  • californium
  • protactinium
  • einsteinium
  • uranium
  • fermium
  • neptunium
  • mendelevium
  • plutonium
  • nobelium
  • americium
  • lawrencium
  • curium
  • Academic Standards

    National Academy of Sciences
    The National Academy of Sciences provides guidelines for teaching science in grades K12 to promote scientific literacy. To view the standards, visit this Web site:books.nap.edu/html/nses/html/overview.html#content.
    This disc addresses the following national standards:

    • Physical Science: Structure and properties of matter; Structure of atoms; Chemical reactions; Interactions of energy and matter
    • Science and Technology: Understanding about science and technology
    • Science in Personal and Social Perspectives: Science and technology in society; Science and technology in local, national, and global challenges
    • History and Nature of Science: Science as a human endeavor; Historical perspectives

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