Skip Discover Education Main Navigation

Lesson Plans Library 6-8 > Fine Arts
Careers in Song and Dance
Careers in Song and Dance
Grade level: 6-8 Subject: Fine Arts Duration: 3 class periods
 



lesson plan support
Student Objectives
  • Identify different careers in music and dance.
  • Create a job posting for one career, including responsibilities, requirements, salary range, and career outlook.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the necessary education and experience required for specific careers in dance and music.
Materials
  • Careers in Performing Arts I, Song and Dance, video
  • Computer with Internet access
Procedures
  1. Ask students to name the careers featured in the video, and make two lists on the board, one each for music and dance. Then ask students to brainstorm other careers involving music and dance. Here are some examples:
    • Music
      • Music performer
      • Composer
      • Lyricist
      • Songwriter
      • Music teacher
      • Music publisher
      • Music producer (record producer)
      • Studio manager
      • Music engineer / sound technician
      • Music critic
      • Orchestra musician
      • Music historian
      • Conductor
      • Music therapist
      • Music lawyer
      • Instrument repairperson
      • Disc jockey (DJ)
      • Tour manager

      • Music store manager
      • A&R (artist and repertoire) manager
    • Dance
      • Dancer (ballet, modern, jazz)
      • Dance instructor
      • Dance agent
      • Dance or movement therapist
      • Specialized physical therapist
      • Choreographer
      • Costume designer
      • Dance-company manager
      • Dance-studio owner
      • Dance historian
      • Dance critic
      • Dance notator
      • Stage manager
      • Artistic director
      • Arts administrator
  2. Tell students that their task is to choose and explore one career in song or dance that interests them. They can choose one from the list or find another from their research. They will research more about that career and develop a mock job posting for it. The posting should include the following information under these headings:
    • Job title:Position and level
    • Job description:Overall duties and daily responsibilities
    • Requirements:Essential skills and experience; including number of years experience
    • Required education:Requisite degrees in specific field
    • Salary range:Typical salary range (from entry level to experienced)
    • Career Outlook:Expected growth in coming years
  3. Have students begin their search at the site below, where they can create an occupation profile for a career in their state. They will find information about skills, tasks, and education related to a career, as well as recent national and state salaries and trends.
  4. The following sites will provide more information about specific careers:
  5. Give students time to conduct research and develop a job posting. You may wish to encourage them to search for actual job openings, using national newspapers and online resources.
  6. Have students submit their job postings electronically. Assign one or two students to compile them into a mock classified section of the newspaper. Postings should be separated into two sections, "Careers in Dance" and "Careers in Music," each organized alphabetically by job title. Print out enough copies for each student.
  7. Allow students to read the job postings, circling any of interest.
  8. To conclude the lesson, choose a few of the most popular choices and talk about the experience and education necessary to prepare for a specific career: What high school classes or other training, after-school jobs, volunteer opportunities, or extracurricular activities would be good experience? Is a college degree required or highly recommended? If so, what kinds of degrees? What activities, organizations, or internships help direct someone in a particular career field?

Back to Top

Assessment
Use the following three-point rubric to evaluate students' work during this lesson.
  • 3 points: Students identified many careers in music and dance; thoroughly researched one career and created a clear, comprehensive job posting with all the requested information; demonstrated a strong understanding of the necessary education and experience required for specific careers.
  • 2 points: Students identified several careers in music and dance; researched one career and created an acceptable job posting with most of the requested information; demonstrated a satisfactory understanding of the necessary education and experience required for specific careers.
  • 1 point: Students identified very few or no careers in music and dance; conducted little research for one career and created a job posting without much of the requested information; demonstrated a weak understanding of the necessary education and experience required for specific careers.

Back to Top

Vocabulary
acoustic
Definition:Music or an instrument that is not amplified electronically
Context:Daniel's band is particularly interesting because it includes acoustic and electric instruments, as well as a DJ.

composition
Definition:A piece of music created by a songwriter or the process of creating the music; the way a piece of music is arranged
Context:One way Daniel teaches music composition is showing the students how words can express musical ideas.

music publisher
Definition:Someone who finds artists or songwriters to promote, then licenses their music to record companies, or for use in film and television
Context:As a music publisher, Jodi finds talented new artists to sell to a record label or film producer.

record producer
Definition:Someone who works in a studio helping artists record their work
Context:A record producer helped Robbyn make a demo tape of her song to distribute to different record companies.

sound engineer
Definition:Someone who operates machines and electrical equipment to record, synchronize, mix, or reproduce music in recording studios or for live performances
Context:A sound engineer makes sure the musicians can hear themselves through the monitors placed on stage.


Back to Top

Academic Standards
Consortium of National Arts Education Associations
The Consortium of National Arts Education Associations has developed national guidelines for what students should know and be able to do in the arts. To view the standards online, go toartsedge.kennedy-center.org/teach/standards.cfm.
This lesson plan addresses the following national standards:
  • Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts
  • Understanding music in relation to history and culture
  • Applying and demonstrating critical and creative thinking skills in dance
  • Demonstrating and understanding dance in various cultures and historical periods
  • Making connections between dance and other disciplines
Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL)
McREL's Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education addresses 14 content areas. To view the standards and benchmarks, visithttp://www.mcrel.org/compendium/browse.asp.
This lesson plan addresses the following national standards:
  • Dance ? Applies critical and creative thinking skills in dance; Understands dance in various cultures and historical periods
  • Music ? Knows and applies appropriate criteria to music and music performances; Understands the relationship between music and history and culture
  • Art Connections ? Understands connections among the various art forms and other disciplines

Back to Top